Hikes, Lectures and Presentations

Aug07

Climbing the Quartz Timber Sale

Reed Crossbow

The Quartz Timber sale is an 847-acre logging project set to take place in the Umpqua National Forest. The timber sale proposes to commercially log and burn older forest in the Cottage Grove Ranger District. We believe that insufficient consideration was given to the presence of imperiled spotted owls and red tree voles, both species dependent on older forests to survive. We met up with Reed Wilson from NEST (Northwest Ecosystem Survey Team) and the Benton Forest Coalition, and he walked us through how to survey for red tree voles.  Surveyors use a crossbow or a bow to shoot a line over large lateral branches and then climb up around 200 feet to look for red tree voles nests.

When the Forest Service conducted surveys, it reported only a couple abandoned red tree vole nests and dismissed the project area as unimportant for the species. Reed and his team over the course of a year found more than 70 active nests in the same areas. The Forest Service has now changed its tune, arguing that these forests are excellent vole habitat and because the species is thriving, there is no need to protect the voles in the Quartz Timber Sale area. 

Needless to say that the work that Reed and NEST do is imperative to the protection and understanding of these treasured old growth forest ecosystems. We are incredibly lucky to have them helping us defend Cascadia’s wild ecosystems in the forest, in the courts, and in the streets.  We will keep you posted on the Quartz Timber Sale.

Check out this short video on the red tree vole survey process!

Apr27

Explore the Elliott State Forest with Cascadia Wildlands

IMG_2035We'll be offering a couple of public hikes into the Elliott State Forest the spring/summer of 2016. The Elliott State Forest is between Reedsport and Coos Bay, and goes as far east as Loon Lake. About half of the Elliott has never been logged before, with big trees that grew back from an 1868 fire, providing valuable habitat for old-growth dependent wildlife.

The Oregon State Land Board moves ahead with the decision to sell the Elliott to a buyer, public or private, that will agree to conservation and job creation mandates. The goal of the sale is to sever the ties between the forest and the Common School Fund, which provides money for K-12 school children. While any potential new owner of the Elliott must show that it will maintain 50% of the forest open for public access, there is no guarantee of what that will entail. 

Cascadia Wildlands continues to look for a creative solution that fulfills the Common School Fund obligations and maintains this magical coastal rainforest in public ownership and open to all to enjoy.  

In the meantime, we want to get you out to explore the Elliott with us. Stay tuned for more details, but be sure to put June 18, 2016 on your calendar to join us in the Elliott State Forest.

Jan14

Stand Up for Public Lands!

In the midst of the ridiculous scene unfolding at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, bigger, darker, and more intelligent forces are working to give away our public lands. 

mt juneOur public lands, our National Forests, our Wildlife Refuges, our National Parks, our Wild and Scenic Rivers, these are cherished and revered places across the Northwest.  They provide so many different values for so many different people and communities. However, consistent efforts driven by the oil and gas industry to give away these lands are gaining traction and need to be met with staunch opposition from the communities that love and thrive off these public treasures.

The recent occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge by militant extremists is part of this movement to give away our public lands.  With these lands ceded to local control, all semblances of science-based management and conservation will be replaced with aggressive resource extraction at the cost of our local communities, our economies, clean water, and recreation.

The actions of these extremists is being capitalized upon by industry and their political puppets, and proposals continue to be rolled out to blatantly steal these lands from the American people.

Stand up for our Public Lands, and Loudly Voice your Support!

Contact your local representatives, your mayors, your city council members, tell them you support public lands and that your community should as well.  Public rallies are being planned across the Pacific Northwest in communities big and small across Oregon and Washington.  Make signs, break out the costumes, let us hear your high school marching band tuba!  It is time to show this nation how we feel about our public forests, mountains, and rivers.

Jan14

Public Lands Rallies Planned Across Oregon

#RefugeRally Announced for Tuesday, Jan 19th
Public will gather to support Malheur refuge, celebrate national public lands
 
3.10.10_D7C3745OREGON/WASHINGTON- Rallies supporting Malheur National Wildlife Refuge and public lands will be held across Oregon and Washington Tuesday, January 19th at noon.
 
The public is invited to join this statewide event expressing appreciation for national public lands, their public servant caretakers, and the positive collaborative efforts between refuge officials, ranchers, environmentalists, and Native Americans that have been underway on the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge for a decade. Speakers will highlight the importance of protecting special places like the Malheur NWR that provide integral wildlife habitat, clean water, climate change mitigation, and recreational opportunities available as a benefit to all Americans.
 
Events are listed below, with details and more events across the state currently being planned. Participants can contact Cascadia Wildlands to receive up-to-date event information, and follow the conversation using #RefugeRally.  This page will continue to be updated.
 
Because of the volatile situation at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, public lands supporters are strongly discouraged from visiting Harney County at this time.
 
Unless otherwise specified, all events will take place at noon:
 
Eugene
Old Federal Building
211 E. 7th Ave, Eugene
 
Press Contacts:
Oregon Wild – Doug Heiken (541-344-0675) dh@oregonwild.org
Cascadia Wildlands – Nick Cady (314) 482-3746 nick@cascwild.org
Center for Biological Diversity – Jared Margolis (802) 310-4054 jmargolis@biologicaldiversity.org
 
***Also in Eugene, Cascadia Wildlands will be hosting a sign-making party on Monday night prior to the rally.  The event will take place at Cascadia Wildlands office at 1247 Willamette Street in Eugene at 5:30pm.  Pizza and beverages will be provided, come help us think up some clever slogans!  More on that event here: https://www.facebook.com/events/446690202205647/
 
Portland
Holladay Park
NE 11th Ave, Portland
 
Press Contacts:
Oregon Wild – Arran Robertson (971) 241-0103 ar@oregonwild.org
Portland Audubon – Bob Sallinger 503 380 -9728 bsallinger@audubonportland.org
Center for Biological Diversity – Tierra Curry (928) 522-3681 tcurry@biologicaldiversity.org
 
Bend
Riverfront Plaza
Brooks St, Bend
 
Press Contact
Oregon Natural Desert Assoc – Dan Morse, (541) 330-2638 dmorse@onda.org
 
La Grande
Pro-Public Lands Potluck
105 Fir St Suite #327
 
Press Contact: Hells Canyon Preservation Council – Darilyn Parry Brown (541) 963-3950 darilyn@hellscanyon.org
 
Seattle:
Federal Building / GSA
Seattle’s Henry M. Jackson Federal Building, 915 2nd Ave, Seattle, WA 98104
             
           Press Contact: Conservation Northwest – Chase Gunnel (206) 675-9747
 
Corvallis:
TBD
Dec16

Mt. June/Hardesty Mountain Roadless Area Threatened with Old-Growth Clearcutting

 
mt june

View from Mt. June

Some of our favorite hikes here at Cascadia Wildlands wind through the Hardesty Mountain Roadless Area just southeast of Eugene.  Hardesty is one of the closest old-growth, roadless areas you can access from Eugene, and is a favorite of hikers and mountain bikers alike.  We have worked for years to safeguard this area for its incredible values.
 
Over a decade ago, Cascadia Wildlands and our conservation allies led successful grassroots campaigns and called upon Rep. Peter DeFazio and other political leaders in Oregon to prevent destructive logging in this treasured area. Due to its ecological and recreational values, the Hardesty Mountain Roadless Area is currently being advocated for a Wilderness designation.
 
There is reason for our continued vigilance.  The Eugene Bureau of Land Management is proposing an old-growth clearcutting project, called "John's Last Stand" in the Hardesty Mountain Roadless Area, right next to the Mt. June hiking trail, and less than a 1/2 mile from Mt. June itself.  Cascadia Wildlands is appalled, and once again is asking for your help in calling upon our political leaders to prevent this reckless logging.
 
 
We are doing everything we can to halt this reckless sale, and if you have time, please reach out to these legislators by phone as well.
 
Rep. Peter DeFazio: 202-225-6416 (DC) or 541-465-6732 (Eugene)
Sen. Ron Wyden: 541-431-0229
Sen. Jeff Merkely: 541-465-6750
 
We again cannot thank you enough for your help and support.  This sale will be stopped.
Oct12

Hiking Southern Oregon: Author Zach Urness to Present in Eugene on October 14

Hiked Opal Creek Trail one too many times? Sick of the crowds at Mount Hood and the Columbia River Gorge? Looking to have a close encounter with Bigfoot? If you answered yes to any of these questions, than you may want to consider a road trip to Southern Oregon.
 
ZachSMALLERTo get you started, Statesman Journal outdoors writer and Oregon author Zach Urness will give a presentation focused on the best day hikes and backpacking trips in the state's southern half from 6:30-8:00 pm on Wednesday, October 14 at Hop Valley Brewing tasting room (990 W. 1st Ave. in Eugene). The free event is sponsored by Cascadia Wildlands and Hop Valley Brewing.
 
The presentation is based on a book Urness co-wrote with longtime author Art Bernstein called "Hiking Southern Oregon," which features hikes among the world's tallest trees, United States' deepest lake and Oregon's third-highest waterfall.
 
He'll be showing videos and pictures from hikes that are easy and family-friendly, along with those traveling deep into remote wilderness areas where meeting another person is about as likely as coming across Bigfoot.
 
The book covers hikes from southeast Oregon's Steens Mountain, past Crater Lake and the Southern Cascades, into the wilderness areas of the Siskiyou Mountains and finally to the redwood coast in extreme northwest California.
 
About Zach Urness: Zach has been an outdoors writer, photographer and videographer in Oregon for eight years. He covers the outdoors andHop Valley environment at the Salem Statesman Journal newspaper, and has written for USA Today, The Oregonian, the Eugene Register-Guard, Mail Tribune and the Grants Pass Daily Courier. When he isn’t hanging out with his 10-month-old daughter Lucy, you’ll find him kayaking, mountain biking or generally exploring wild places all over the Beaver State.
 
Jan27

“The Future of Wilderness in Oregon,” a Community Forum on Feb. 4 in Eugene

"The Future of Wilderness in Oregon," a Community Forum
 February 4, 2015, 6:30-8 pm • 110 Willamette Hall, University of Oregon
 
Oregon has long been regarded as a state full of natural treasures with ample forests, rivers and mountains. We rely on Wilderness to provide clean drinking water, wildlife habitat, recreation and solitude. Wilderness is what defines us as a state, and provides us with a high quality of living. And while our public lands belong to everyone, it takes an act of Congress to protect them from logging, mining and human development. Fortunately, the power to designate areas as Wilderness is in our hands. With an uncertain political landscape, the need to protect our remainingWilderness Forum Web Image wildlands has never been greater.  Join us for an evening to learn and discuss the future of Wilderness in Oregon. The event is free and open to the public.
 
Hosted by the University of Oregon Outdoor Program, Environmental Studies Program, Oregon Wild, Sierra Club, Cascadia Wildlands, Great Old Broads for Wilderness, and Lane County Commissioner Pete Sorenson. For more information, contact Josh Laughlin, Cascadia Wildlands, 541.434.1463.
 
Aug21

OR-7 The Journey : Film Premiere

"OR-7 The Journey"

September 18, 2014 at 7:00pm

Bijou Art Cinemas on 13th Ave. Eugene, Oregon

 
OR-7 The Journey, documentary film presented by Cascadia Wildlands, Oregon Wild, and film producer Clemens Shenk. Eugene, OR film premiere at Bijou Art Cinemas on 13th Avenue on Sept. 18, 2014 at 7pm

Join Cascadia Wildlands and Oregon Wild on September 18, 2014 at 7pm in welcoming Oregon filmmaker Clemens Schenk for the Eugene premiere of "OR-7: The Journey".

 

 

RSVP HERE on the event page.

 

Buy TICKETS ONLINE.

 

"OR-7: The Journey" is an inspiring documentary chronicling the remarkable dispersal of a young male wolf — OR-7, also known as Journey — from northeast Oregon down into California who has recently formed a pack southwest of Crater Lake to become the first wolf pack in the Oregon Cascades in nearly 70 years.
 
Come celebrate wolf recovery, wildlife, Oregon's conservation values, and OR-7's epic journey. This film tells the story not just of Journey, but also of his species. It is a story of survival and inspiration. But even as most Americans have come to appreciate native wildlife and wild places, 21st century science and values are coming head to head with old prejudices that put the future of wolves – and OR-7 – in jeopardy.
 
  • The showing will be held at the Bijou Theater at 492 E. 13th Ave in Eugene, OR at 7:00pm. 
  • Tickets are $10 and are available through the Bijou’s website HERE. There is limited seating and the show is expected to sell out, purchasing tickets in advance is strongly encouraged.
  • A Q&A session will take place after the movie with wolf advocates and the filmmaker. 
  • Cascadia Wildlands merchandise will be available for purchase at the event.
 
For more info about the movie specifically, please follow this link.
 
Learn more about OR-7.
 

 

Maximize the impact of your donation to our wolf fund today, by taking advantage of the

 

Mountain Rose Herbs Matching Gift for Wolf Donations!
 
 
 
 
Donations_Wolf_MtnRoseHerbs_graph_DRAFT_C.3_21AugTry
Aug28

Talking Tongass: Cozmically

Bob TalkingCome hear Cascadia Wildland's Executive Director and large mammal biologist Bob Ferris talk about the issues surrounding the 17-million acre Tongass National Forest in Southeastern Alaska for the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry Science Pub series.  

Bob is trained as a scientist and has spent the last two decades working in the conservation community.  He was also part of the volunteer team that went to Fort Saint John, British Columbia in late January 1996 to help capture and process the last set of wolves to be released in Yellowstone and Central Idaho.  (Click here for more information)

When: Thursday, September 12, 2013
Time: 7:00-9:00pm
Where:
 
 
Event Schedule: 
 
5:00 – People begin to arrive to find seats, order food
7:00pm – Introduction and trivia, by OMSI host
7:15pm – Speaker starts presentation
8:15pm – Speaker ends presentation, Q&A starts
9:00pm – Event ends
 

For More Details Visit OMSI Event Page

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